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Ethan Reed
Ethan Reed

How Much Does It Really Cost To Buy A House



On this episode of Cope'ing With Money, we're looking at something, as usual, very near and dear to my heart, but also timely, because I'm actually doing it right now. We're talking about not just moving into a home, but figuring out the actual cost of buying a house.




how much does it really cost to buy a house



Many lenders will require you to have homeowners insurance to protect the asset. This cost will typically be added to your monthly mortgage amount. For most people, their house is the largest asset that they have. It is the biggest piece of their net worth. So we want to make sure we protect it. People talk about "securing the bag." Well, part of security is protecting that bag through insurance. So there's another cost that you'll have to incur on a monthly basis or a yearly basis, depending on how you decide to pay it off.


So before we've even bought the house, there's a bunch of fees that we need to be aware of prior to the purchase. That sticker price has already risen. Now we're talking about the actual move-in process. Please, please, please do not underestimate the cost of actually moving into a home. Yes, you can save some money by buying lunch and gathering your friends to help move some boxes. But even that pizza costs money.


After a much longer list than you probably expected when you clicked on this video, understanding whether or not your home that you're moving into has major renovations to be done is crucial to understanding the actual cost of owning your home.


This is, for most of us, the largest purchase we will ever make, and without having this type of knowledge and understanding, you may face the same anxiety that I did years ago. But now that I know what I'm up against, I've been able to allow my budget and my finances to really afford the actual cost of my home, not just the sticker price.


Home utility expenses can quickly turn into a much larger bill than most new homeowners expect. Homes are typically bigger than apartments, which means they can cost much more to heat and cool. The average homeowner in America spends about $270 a month on home utilities.


The costs to buy a house add up. But with a little bit of planning, you can be prepared to pay for everything that comes along with the list price. That might involve choosing a home with a lower purchase price to make sure that your budget can comfortably support added expenses.


2) How much will you pay upfront? For first time home buyers, closing costs can be an unpleasant surprise. Yes, not only are you putting down an enormous amount of your savings towards this purchase, you also have to write an additional check to cover fees. Closing costs vary based on your home, and cover origination charges, title insurance, inspection fees, legal services, prepaid expenses and escrow. Typically, home buyers will pay between about 2 to 5 percent of the purchase price of their home in closing fees. For example, if you buy a home for $300k, you could owe $60k for the down payment (20%), plus up to $15k in closing costs. SmartAssest has a thorough calculator to give you an idea.


However, that doesn't necessarily mean you are going to get that rate. Banks take into account your credit score, the type of loan and how much you put down. It also depends on the lender; some may offer lower rates than others.


How much it costs to own a home depends on the home you own. Most people make monthly mortgage payments that includes taxes and homeowners insurance, and sometimes, mortgage insurance. It costs money to pay for electricity, heating, and water, and homeowners have to be prepared for unexpected expenses such as replacing a roof. If your home sits on a large property, yard care may be an expense, and if you live in a condominium or gated community, you will likely have HOA fees as well."}},"@type": "Question","name": "What Are the Benefits of Owning a Home?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "There are many benefits of homeownership. It can be financially beneficial because every mortgage payment helps you earn equity. Some mortgage payments may be lower than rent payments over time so that you may earn money in the long run. Homeownership may offer tax benefits, as well, and it can help you build your credit.","@type": "Question","name": "How Much Should I Save for Home Repairs?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Some financial experts suggest budgeting for 1% or 2% of your mortgage balance as a yearly maintenance and repair fund, but the amount you should save depends on your home's age, condition, and size.","@type": "Question","name": "What Monthly Costs Are Included In Home Ownership?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Most homeowners pay a monthly mortgage. Other potential monthly costs include taxes, homeowners insurance, private mortgage insurance (if you have an FHA mortgage), and HOA fees, if applicable. You will also likely pay monthly heating and cooling, electricity, and water. If you have taken out a home equity loan or a home equity line of credit, you may pay those each month as well."]}]}] Investing Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All Simulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard Economy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All News Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All Reviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All Academy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All TradeSearchSearchPlease fill out this field.SearchSearchPlease fill out this field.InvestingInvesting Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All SimulatorSimulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard EconomyEconomy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal FinancePersonal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All NewsNews Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All ReviewsReviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All AcademyAcademy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All Financial Terms Newsletter About Us Follow Us Facebook Instagram LinkedIn TikTok Twitter YouTube Table of ContentsExpandTable of ContentsProperty TaxesHOA and Condo FeesHomeowners InsuranceThe RoofThe HVAC SystemThe Electrical SystemPlumbingTermitesMoldLandscaping and Lawn CareHomeownership Costs FAQsThe Bottom LineHome InsuranceHome OwnershipThe Hidden Costs of Owning a HomeThough the perks are many, watch out for these extra expenses


How much it costs to own a home depends on the home you own. Most people make monthly mortgage payments that includes taxes and homeowners insurance, and sometimes, mortgage insurance. It costs money to pay for electricity, heating, and water, and homeowners have to be prepared for unexpected expenses such as replacing a roof. If your home sits on a large property, yard care may be an expense, and if you live in a condominium or gated community, you will likely have HOA fees as well.


Ever wonder how much you'll need to save for a down payment? Is it really more than you think? It's possible that your first estimate of what it takes to buy a home might be too low. There are some hidden costs that you might not have considered, and they add up.


The down payment is one of the most important factors in reaching your goal to buy a home. Not only does it show that you're responsible, but in most cases it can dictate which loan program you qualify for and therefore what type of home you can afford. So how much do you need to save?


If you're looking for a fixer upper, then the initial cost to buy this house will be lower. But if you're buying something with all of the bells and whistles, it might cost more. If there's a homeowner's association (HOA), what are the monthly dues like? HOA fees vary a lot from one neighborhood to another, but they can be hundreds of dollars a month.


In addition to the down payment and closing costs, you also have to think about all of those unaccounted for expenses that might crop up at any time. For example, what if your furnace goes out in the middle of winter? How much will it cost to fix, and who will do it?


So when you're talking to your lender, make sure you have a clear idea of how much you can afford in terms of home price. If you choose one thing, like the size of your house or number of bathrooms, that will affect other things. And this might require spending more money on something else that you weren't expecting. 041b061a72


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